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Hemolytic uremic syndrome, post-diarrheal (HUS)

1996 Case Definition


CSTE Position Statement(s)

  • 09-ID-37

Clinical Description

Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by the acute onset of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, renal injury, and low platelet count. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) also is characterized by these features but can include central nervous system (CNS) involvement and fever and may have a more gradual onset. Most cases of HUS (but few cases of TTP) occur after an acute gastrointestinal illness (usually diarrheal).

Laboratory Criteria for Diagnosis

The following are both present at some time during the illness:
  • Anemia (acute onset) with microangiopathic changes (i.e., schistocytes, burr cells, or helmet cells) on peripheral blood smear, AND
  • Renal injury (acute onset) evidenced by either hematuria, proteinuria, or elevated creatinine level (i.e., greater than or equal to 1.0 mg/dL in a child aged less than 13 years or greater than or equal to 1.5 mg/dL in a person aged greater than or equal to 13 years, or greater than or equal to 50% increase over baseline)
Note: A low platelet count can usually, but not always, be detected early in the illness, but it may then become normal or even high. If a platelet count obtained within 7 days after onset of the acute gastrointestinal illness is not less than 150,000/mm3, other diagnoses should be considered.

Case Classification

Probable

  • An acute illness diagnosed as HUS or TTP that meets the laboratory criteria in a patient who does not have a clear history of acute or bloody diarrhea in preceding 3 weeks, OR
  • An acute illness diagnosed as HUS or TTP, that a) has onset within 3 weeks after onset of an acute or bloody diarrhea and b) meets the laboratory criteria except that microangiopathic changes are not confirmed

Confirmed

An acute illness diagnosed as HUS or TTP that both meets the laboratory criteria and began within 3 weeks after onset of an episode of acute or bloody diarrhea

Comment(s)

Some investigators consider HUS and TTP to be part of a continuum of disease. Therefore, criteria for diagnosing TTP on the basis of CNS involvement and fever are not provided because cases diagnosed clinically as post-diarrheal TTP also should meet the criteria for HUS. These cases are reported as post-diarrheal HUS. Most diarrhea-associated HUS is caused by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, most commonly E. coli O157. If a patient meets the case definition for both shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) and HUS, the case should be reported for each of the conditions.

The 1996 case definition appearing on this page was re-published in the 2009 CSTE position statement 09-ID-37. Thus, the 1996 and 2010 versions of the case definition are identical.

Related Case Definition(s)




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